Utility prices fall in Europe between 1,5 and 16% – official statistics released

The latest Eurostat statistics on electricity and gas prices in the EU Member States plus Norway, Croatia and Turkey were released today in a news release.  Based on this information:

In the EU27, household electricity prices1 fell by 1.5% between the second half of 2008 and the second half of 2009, and gas prices2 by 16.0%. Between the same time periods of 2007 and 2008, household electricity prices in the EU27 rose by 6.8%, and gas prices by 21.0%.

These figures are published3 by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.

Lowest electricity prices in PPS in Finland, France and Greece

Between the second half of 2008 and the second half of 2009, the largest decreases in household electricity prices in national currency4 were registered in Cyprus (-20%), Italy (-10%), Ireland (-9%) and Denmark (-8%), and the highest increases in Poland (+18%), Luxembourg (+17%) and Slovenia (+16%).

Expressed in euro, average household electricity prices in the second half of 2009 were lowest in Bulgaria
(8.2 euro per 100 kWh), Estonia (9.2) and Lithuania (9.3), and highest in Denmark (25.5), Germany (22.9) and Italy (20.0). The average electricity price in the EU27 was 16.5 euro per 100 kWh.

When adjusted for purchasing power, the lowest household electricity prices were found in Finland (10.3 PPS5 per 100 kWh), France (10.6) and Greece (11.2), and the highest in Hungary (24.3), Poland (22.0) and Germany (21.4).

The share of taxes in household electricity prices was 26% on average in the EU27, ranging from 5% in Malta and the United Kingdom to 56% in Denmark and 41% in Germany.

Lowest gas prices in PPS in Luxembourg, Belgium and the United Kingdom

Between the second half of 2008 and the second half of 2009, the largest decreases in household gas prices in national currency were observed in Belgium (-29%), Italy (-26%), Latvia and Slovenia (both -24%) and Germany (-23%), and the highest increases in Hungary (+11%), Lithuania and Poland (both +6%).

Expressed in euro, average household gas prices in the second half of 2009 were lowest in Romania (7.5 euro per gigajoule), Bulgaria (9.7) and Estonia (10.1), and highest in Sweden (26.9), Denmark (26.8) and the Netherlands (18.7). The average gas price in the EU27 was 14.7 euro per gigajoule.

When adjusted for purchasing power, the lowest household gas prices were recorded in Luxembourg (10.7 PPS per gigajoule), Belgium (12.7) and the United Kingdom (12.9), and the highest in Sweden (23.8), Poland (21.8) and Bulgaria (20.2).

The share of taxes in household gas prices was 22% on average in the EU27, ranging from 5% in Portugal and the United Kingdom to 50% in Denmark and 46% in Romania.Household* electricity prices including all taxes

Average price of 100 kWh in 2nd half of 2009:
in euro in PPS Price change
2nd half 2009/
2nd half 2008**
EU27 16.45 16.45 -1.5
Euro area 17.35 : 0.8
Belgium : : :
Bulgaria 8.18 17.07 -0.6
Czech Republic 13.94 20.01 11.8
Denmark 25.53 17.12 -8.5
Germany 22.94 21.36 4.5
Estonia 9.20 12.52 8.3
Ireland 18.55 15.88 -8.8
Greece 10.32 11.16 -6.1
Spain 16.84 17.86 8.2
France 12.25 10.61 1.8
Italy 19.97p 18.32p -10.1p
Cyprus 16.42 16.67 -19.5
Latvia 10.54 14.44 4.8
Lithuania 9.26 13.71 7.1
Luxembourg 18.82 15.72 17.0
Hungary 15.96 24.26 11.6
Malta 15.13 20.68 -1.5
Netherlands 18.50p 16.46p 3.9p
Austria 19.09 17.17 7.7
Poland 12.91 22.03 17.9
Portugal 15.94 18.61 4.5
Romania 9.79 17.94 2.1
Slovenia 13.41 16.24 16.0
Slovakia 15.60 21.12 2.2
Finland 12.89 10.33 1.3
Sweden 16.46 14.60 -0.6
United Kingdom 14.07 15.37 -4.6
Croatia 11.64 16.22 0.0
Turkey 11.79 20.20 8.9
Norway 15.63 12.39 -7.3

*     Household electricity prices refer to households with annual consumption between 2 500 and 5 000 kWh.

**    Based on prices in national currency.

–     Not applicable

p    Provisional

:     Data not available

Household* gas prices including all taxes

Average price per gigajoule in 2nd half of 2009
In euro In PPS Price change
2nd half 2009/
2nd half 2008
EU27 14.67 14.67 -16.0
Euro area 15.99 : -18.7
Belgium 14.33 12.67 -29.2
Bulgaria 9.67 20.18 -11.0
Czech Republic 13.11 18.83 -6.9
Denmark 26.77 17.95 0.6
Germany 16.35 15.22 -22.8
Estonia 10.07 13.71 -2.2
Ireland 15.29 13.09 -15.3
Greece*** : : :
Spain 14.88 15.78 -18.0
France 16.20 14.04 0.9
Italy 14.84 13.62 -25.8
Cyprus*** : : :
Latvia 10.52 14.42 -24.4
Lithuania 11.29 16.71 6.2
Luxembourg 12.82 10.71 -10.2
Hungary 13.23 20.12 11.1
Malta*** : : :
Netherlands 18.70p 16.64p -11.1p
Austria 17.23 15.50 0.7
Poland 12.78 21.81 5.8
Portugal 16.52 19.28 -5.5
Romania 7.45 13.65 -8.2
Slovenia 14.96 18.12 -24.3
Slovakia 13.21 17.89 2.2
Finland*** : : :
Sweden 26.86 23.82 -1.8
United Kingdom 11.84 12.94 -3.1
Croatia 9.10 12.68 20.1
Turkey 8.55 14.65 -25.5

*     Household gas prices refer to prices for households with an annual consumption between 20 and 200 GJ.

**    Based on prices in national currency.

***  Greece, Cyprus, Malta and Finland do not have a significant gas market for household consumers and therefore did not report gas prices.

–     Not applicable

p    Provisional

:     Data not available

  1. The electricity prices refer to prices for a household with an annual consumption of between 2 500 and 5 000 kWh, and include taxes. These prices are weighted by national household consumption to give the EU averages. The final price charged to electricity customers will depend on the structure of electricity tariffs and contracts which normally contains a number of factors, including fixed charges and unit prices that vary according to the amount of electricity and the time of day it is consumed.
  2. The gas prices refer to prices for a household with an annual consumption of 20 to 200 gigajoules (GJ) (between 5 556 and 55 556 kWh) of gas, and include taxes. These prices are weighted by national household consumption to give the EU averages. The final price charged to gas customers will depend on the structure of gas tariffs and contracts which normally contain a number of factors, including fixed charges and unit prices that vary according to the volume of gas consumed.
  3. Eurostat, Data in Focus, 22/2010 “Electricity prices for second semester 2009” and 21/2010 “Natural gas prices for second semester 2009”. Both publications are available free of charge in PDF format on the Eurostat website.
  4. Percentage changes in prices at Member State level are based on prices in national currencies. Prices are given in national currencies, euro (based on average exchange rate for second semester 2009) and PPS (Purchasing Power Standard, annual estimated value).
  5. The Purchasing Power Standard (PPS) is an artificial common reference currency unit that eliminates price level differences between countries. Thus one PPS buys the same volume of goods/services in all countries.

Citation: Eurostat News Release STAT/10/75

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