Urban Environment: Wind speed and the ecosystem

[tweetmeme http://www.URL.com%5D Christofer Bang, John L. Sabo (Arizona State University) and Stanley H. Faeth (University of North Carolina at Greensboro) have completed a study on the effects of wind speed modifications in the urban environment on the ecosystem.  The abstract of their paper reads:  The often dramatic effects of urbanization on community and ecosystem properties, such as primary productivity, abundances, and diversity are now well-established. In most cities local primary productivity increases and this extra energy flows upwards to alter diversity and relative abundances in higher trophic levels. The abiotic mechanisms thought to be responsible for increases in urban productivity are altered temperatures and light regimes, and increased nutrient and water inputs. However, another abiotic factor, wind speed, is also influenced by urbanization and well known for altering primary productivity in agricultural systems. Wind effects on primary productivity have heretofore not been studied in the context of urbanization.

Methodology/Principal Findings

We designed a field experiment to test if increased plant growth often observed in cities is explained by the sheltering effects of built structures. Wind speed was reduced by protecting Encelia farinosa (brittlebush) plants in urban, desert remnant and outlying desert localities via windbreaks while controlling for water availability and nutrient content. In all three habitats, we compared E. farinosa growth when protected by experimental windbreaks and in the open. E. farinosa plants protected against ambient wind in the desert and remnant areas grew faster in terms of biomass and height than exposed plants. As predicted, sheltered plants did not differ from unprotected plants in urban areas where wind speed is already reduced.

Conclusion/Significance

Our results indicate that reductions in wind speed due to built structures in cities contribute to increased plant productivity and thus also to changes in abundances and diversity of higher trophic levels. Our study emphasizes the need to incorporate wind speed in future urban ecological studies, as well as in planning for green space and sustainable cities.

Read the full article here in PDF format.

Citation: Bang C, Sabo JL, Faeth SH (2010) Reduced Wind Speed Improves Plant Growth in a Desert City. PLoS ONE 5(6): e11061. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0011061

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